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After A Powerful Earthquake Struck Japan, Four People Died And More Than A Hundred Were Injured.

Authorities say four people were killed and over 100 were injured in Japan on Thursday after a massive nighttime earthquake shook vast portions of the east coast and sparked a tsunami warning.

The 7.4-magnitude quake off the coast of Fukushima wrecked a bullet train, created highway breaches, and flung merchandise from store shelves.

In the early hours of Thursday, authorities in northeast Japan reduced a tsunami warning for waves of up to a metre (three feet) after authorities discovered water levels up to 30 centimetres higher than normal in some regions.

In the early hours of Thursday, authorities in northeast Japan reduced a tsunami warning for waves of up to a metre (three feet) after authorities discovered water levels up to 30 centimetres higher than normal in some regions.

Multiple minor jolts continued to hammer the region into Thursday morning, causing nerves to fray only days after Japan commemorated the 11th anniversary of the devastating earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear calamity that struck the country.

In a country with strict construction rules designed to prevent against disaster from frequent earthquakes, the damage appeared to be moderate, and officials said there were no abnormalities at nuclear plants.

Four deaths have been reported, according to government spokesman Hirokazu Matsuno, though investigations into whether they were caused directly by the quake are still ongoing.

He went on to say that another 107 persons were hurt.

“We’ve received reports indicating there are no data anomalies in the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear reactors, as well as the Onagawa nuclear plant,” Matsuno added, referring to the Fukushima Daiichi and Daini nuclear plants, as well as two others in the region.

The Fukushima Daiichi plant’s operator, TEPCO, stated its facilities were working properly on Thursday.

The quake struck at a depth of 60 kilometres (37 miles) shortly after 11.30 p.m., preceded by a 6.1-magnitude tremor in the same location, according to Japan’s Meteorological Agency.

“There were two massive earthquakes in our area. The first one was enormous and shook violently. I was getting ready to go when the second, larger one struck “AFP spoke with a municipal official in the Fukushima city of Soma.

I was on the second floor of a two-story house and couldn’t keep my balance; it was quite dangerous.”

The power has been restored.

Employees at a store in Shiroishi city were cleaning up damage such as merchandise fell from shelves and a partially caved-in roof.

“It’s quite ironic.” We had a similar-scale earthquake exactly a year ago,” store employee Yoshinari Kiwaki told AFP.

“We already knew what we’d have to work on here in the morning when we felt the tremor last night,” the 62-year-old said, adding that it would take around a month to get the store back in operation.

The tremors also shook the capital and sent parts of Tokyo and other areas into darkness for a time.

In the immediate aftermath of the quake, over two million houses in Tokyo and elsewhere were without electricity, but power was gradually restored during the night. On Thursday morning, 30,000 houses were still without power, with another 4,300 without water.

A stone wall collapsed at the site of Aoba castle in Sendai, while a Shinkansen bullet train derailed north of Fukushima city, among other reports of damage.

The disaster caused no injuries, but 75 passengers and three crew members were stuck for four hours before being able to leave.

Japan is located on the Pacific “Ring of Fire,” a swath of active seismicity that spans from Southeast Asia to the Pacific Ocean.

Although earthquakes occur frequently in the country, it is still haunted by the memory of the 2011 disaster, which claimed the lives of 18,500 people, the majority of whom died in the tsunami.

Extensive cleaning has been carried out around the crippled Fukushima plant, and no-go zones now span just 2.4 percent of the region, down from 12 percent, albeit populations in many towns remain significantly lower than previously.

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