News

Taiwan hit by widespread power outages

On Thursday, numerous sections of Taiwan experienced power outages as a result of an “event” at a power plant, according to the presidential office.

According to reports, the blackouts occurred after 9 a.m. (0100 GMT) across the island, from Taipei’s capital to central Taichung and southern Pingtung counties.

Taiwan hit by widespread power outages

The power outages coincided with President Tsai Ing-meeting’s wens with former US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

They also arrived a day after a delegation of former US security officials paid a visit to Taiwan, a visit criticized by Beijing, which regards Taiwan as its territory and rejects any official links the island has with foreign countries.

According to the Presidential Office, the blackouts were triggered by “an incident” at a power facility in Kaohsiung’s southern district.

While the president’s office had normal power, the live stream of Tsai’s meeting with Pompeo had been canceled, according to the White House.

“President Tsai has directed the cabinet and related agencies to determine the source of the outage… and restore power as quickly as possible,” the statement said.

A failure happened at Kaohsiung’s Hsinta power plant, the island’s third-largest coal-fired station, which delivers around a seventh of Taiwan’s power, according to state-run Taipower.

It subsequently tripped an ultra-high voltage station in neighboring Tainan, resulting in the blackouts, according to the report.

According to the firm, the outage affected around 5.5 million residences in Taiwan, 4 million of which have now had electricity restored.

After the incident, the Hsinta plant was disconnected from the electrical grid, and hydro and other power plants were brought online to provide electricity, according to Economic Minister Wang Mei-Hua. Police officers were shown on television directing traffic as traffic signals failed and some businesses were forced to close owing to a lack of power.

The power outage impacted an unspecified number of Taiwan High-Speed Rail trains, according to the company.

Some trains operating in southern Tainan, Pingtung, and central Nantou have been delayed or suspended, according to the Taiwan Railways Administration.

Large power outages do occur on the island from time to time, especially during the summer when demand is higher.

Following public outrage over widespread power outages that affected more than six million Taiwanese households, Taiwan’s economic minister resigned in 2017.

Demand increased during a heatwave in May of last year, resulting in blackouts.

On Thursday, numerous sections of Taiwan experienced power outages as a result of an “event” at a power plant, according to the presidential office.

According to reports, the blackouts occurred after 9 a.m. (0100 GMT) across the island, from Taipei’s capital to central Taichung and southern Pingtung counties.

The power outages coincided with President Tsai Ing-meeting’s wens with former US Secretary of State Mike Pompeo.

They also arrived a day after a delegation of former US security officials paid a visit to Taiwan, a visit criticized by Beijing, which regards Taiwan as its territory and rejects any official links the island has with foreign countries.

According to the Presidential Office, the blackouts were triggered by “an incident” at a power facility in Kaohsiung’s southern district.

While the president’s office had normal power, the live stream of Tsai’s meeting with Pompeo had been canceled, according to the White House.

“President Tsai has directed the cabinet and related agencies to determine the source of the outage… and restore power as quickly as possible,” the statement said.

A failure happened at Kaohsiung’s Hsinta power plant, the island’s third-largest coal-fired station, which delivers around a seventh of Taiwan’s power, according to state-run Taipower.

It subsequently tripped an ultra-high voltage station in neighboring Tainan, resulting in the blackouts, according to the report.

According to the firm, the outage affected around 5.5 million residences in Taiwan, 4 million of which have now had electricity restored.

After the incident, the Hsinta plant was disconnected from the electrical grid, and hydro and other power plants were brought online to provide electricity, according to Economic Minister Wang Mei-Hua. Police officers were shown on television directing traffic as traffic signals failed and some businesses were forced to close owing to a lack of power.

The power outage impacted an unspecified number of Taiwan High-Speed Rail trains, according to the company.

Some trains operating in southern Tainan, Pingtung, and central Nantou have been delayed or suspended, according to the Taiwan Railways Administration.

Large power outages do occur on the island from time to time, especially during the summer when demand is higher.

Following public outrage over widespread power outages that affected more than six million Taiwanese households, Taiwan’s economic minister resigned in 2017.

Demand increased during a heatwave in May of last year, resulting in blackouts.

Show More

Related Articles

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Back to top button